Wednesday, July 22, 2009

This is My Body


On the night before He died Christ took bread into His hands, blessed and broke it, and gave it to is disciples saying: "This is my Body".
The Blessed Sacrament is Christ, the whole Christ. He was giving us Himself.
In so many other things He laid the stress on the invisible, the immaterial; His kingdom, He said is not of this earth: His peace is not of this world.
Yet, in giving Himself to the world, He deliberately chose to emphasize the body.
Why?
The body is, for us, the means by which we can give ourselves wholly.
We say: "Go, my thoughts are with you," or "My soul goes with you." And we know that, though something of ourself is with the traveller, essentially we remain separate from him.
We can give someone devoted care, unfailing kindness, and all our worldly possessions, but still we have kept ourselves.
But when we give our body willingly to another as the means of deliberate self-donation, then our union with the other is complete.
We surrender out intimacy, the secret of ourselves, with the giving of our body; and we cannot give it with-out our will, our thoughts, our minds, and our souls.

Christ surrendered the secret of Himself to each one of us when He gave us His Body. In Holy Communion this surrender of the secret of Himself goes on.

1 comment:

Pilgrimsarbour said...

Martin,

Congratulations on your one year bloggiversary!

One of the questions I posed to Dave was regarding his understanding of what Christ meant when He said:

[51] "I am the living bread which came down from heaven; if any one eats of this bread, he will live for ever; and the bread which I shall give for the life of the world is my flesh" (John 6:51).

I expect that Dave will see this word "flesh" as a reference to the Eucharist. However, I see this as a reference to His death on the cross. That is where He gave His flesh "for the life of the world."

I do not preclude a "spiritual presence" of Christ in the Eucharist. But I do not see the Scriptures teaching that Christ is present corporeally in the bread and wine.

Blessings in Christ,

Pilgrimsarbour